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Limo Service in Atlanta, IN

When you're navigating the congested streets of Indianapolis, finding efficient and reliable transportation is easier said than done. With its maze of tiny roads, limited parking, and awful traffic, getting around the city is more time-consuming and stressful than it is relaxing. That's where a limo service in Atlanta, IN, can rescue you quickly by providing a hassle-free, superior way to travel in comfort and style. Whether you're a local resident or a visitor, hiring a knowledgeable chauffeur for your transportation needs in Indianapolis isn't just fun - it's smart and savvy. And when you need the very best car service in The Crossroads of America, look no further than LSG International.

Service Areas

Limo Service Atlanta, IN

LSG International takes great pride in our team of highly skilled and professional chauffeurs. We are confident in their abilities to provide exceptional customer service, as they are not only experienced motorists but also friendly and attentive hosts. With their extensive knowledge of Indianapolis' roads and traffic patterns, you can rest assured that you will arrive at your destination safely, comfortably, and on time. Our chauffeurs prioritize your satisfaction, and we are confident that you will enjoy a seamless travel experience from start to finish with LSG International.

 Wedding Limo Service Atlanta, IN

At LSG International, we understand that traveling with a group is about more than just getting from point A to point B - it's about fun experiences and making memories that will last a lifetime. Our fleet of impeccably maintained vehicles offers a wide selection of luxury options to suit any occasion or group size. From sleek sedans and spacious SUVs to stylish stretch limousines, we have the perfect vehicle to ensure your group travels in absolute comfort and style.

 Birthday Party Limo Service Atlanta, IN

At LSG International, we understand that no two group travel experiences are the same. That's why we provide customized chauffeur services that can be tailored to your needs. Whether it's transportation for a corporate event, a corporate event near Indianapolis, a wedding party, or just a ride to the airport, our team will work hard to exceed your needs. We take care of everything from coordinating multiple pickups and drop-offs to accommodating special requests. Our goal is to ensure a hassle-free and memorable experience for your group by going the extra mile to ensure your comfort and convenience.

 Bachelor Party Limo Service Atlanta, IN

Have you ever used a popular rideshare app with high hopes, only to find that your driver was late and didn't care about missing your pickup time? Unfortunately, this happens all too often. You won't ever have to worry about unprofessional experiences when you book with LSG International. Our drivers understand that you have places to be and that you've got to be there on time. With our advanced dispatch and tracking resources, we monitor traffic conditions and adjust our routes on the fly to ensure you reach your destination on time and without stress.

 Bachelorette Party Limo Service Atlanta, IN

In the past, most limo driving services required you to book over the phone. In fact, most drivers will tell you that 90% of limousine reservations are still made over the phone. However, many limo services, like LSG International, now take reservations online. The process is pretty simple.

Simply head over to our website and check out our fleet online. Put in your preferred date range so you can see our schedule and fleet availability. Be sure to let us know how many people will be in your party, how long you'll need your limo service, and what type of event we'll be driving you to. Once you settle on a vehicle, date range, pick-up location, and drop-off location, you're ready for a free quote. Provide all the details necessary, and before you know it, one of our experienced drivers will be picking you and your group up on time.

 Airport Limo Service Atlanta, IN

1. Vehicle Quality

Have you ever booked a car on a rideshare app thinking you'd be riding in style, only to find out you're riding in a tin can with wheels? When using a ridesharing service, there's always some uncertainty regarding the type of car you'll get. It could be a small, dirty vehicle that doesn't fit your needs. Some ridesharing companies offer luxury options, but there's no guarantee that the car provided will actually be luxurious. However, if you're looking for a stylish ride, a limo service may be the way to go. With a limo service, you have the freedom to choose your own vehicle, and you can rest assured that it will be clean and meet your expectations.

2. Fluctuating Price

One of the most frustrating aspects of using ridesharing apps is that their pricing is unreliable. The cost of a ride usually depends on the availability of drivers and the demand for rides at a certain time. If there are fewer drivers available than there are people who need rides, the prices may increase. However, this is not the case with limousine services from LSG International. When you book a limo service online, the price you are quoted is the price you will pay. No sneaky upcharges. No fluctuating rates. That means that you will always know the exact cost of your ride ahead of time and can plan accordingly.

3. Boring Experiences

Let's face it - the random Honda Civic that picks you up on the ridesharing app can't compare to a quality stretch limousine, luxury SUV, or party bus provided by LSG International. Booking a limo or luxury car driving service can add a touch of class that you won't get with a stranger's car, even if you're just hitting the town with your spouse. If you're looking to make the event extra special, then opting for a limo service is the way to go.

Limo Service Pricing

When it comes to choosing a chauffeured service, price is always an important factor to consider. It's a good idea to compare prices and get an idea of what is a reasonable price to pay. However, keep in mind that the cheapest price may not always be the best value. In fact, it's possible that the cheapest service may end up being disappointing. Always remember the saying, "Price is what you should pay; value is what you should get. "So, don't compromise on quality for the sake of a lower price.

Whether you're renting a limo or a party bus for a wedding or a major event, it's important to find a reliable and trustworthy service provider that can offer you the best value for your money. At LSG International, we take the guesswork out of pricing by offering online quotes, which you can get in just a couple of minutes.

 10 Passenger Limo Rental Atlanta, IN
 10 Person Limo Rental Atlanta, IN

Personal Referrals and Online Reviews

As you probably know, the internet is the go-to source for information - not just on people, but businesses, too. If you've ever used Yelp or Google to see online reviews, you know what we're talking about. Around 90%of people check out online reviews before making a purchase or visiting a business, and you should, too. A reputable limo service company with loyal customers usually has great reviews. However, you may also come across reviews that mention issues. This is an excellent way to gain a variety of perspectives. Don't forget to check out how the company responds to their reviewers.

In addition to online reviews, you can also ask friends and family members for limo rental referrals. If a relative or close friend has used a specific company for many years, chances are they're a good choice.

Car Service Rental Fleet

A reliable car service company should have a diverse and extensive fleet with different amenities and features to offer. It is important to note that their fleet should have options for accommodating different size groups of passengers.

As everyone's needs and preferences vary when it comes to using a limo rental service, it is essential to communicate the number of passengers you will have to the company. This will enable them to provide you with the most suitable options for your situation. They have cars that can accommodate two to three passengers and larger coach buses that can accommodate dozens.

 12 Passenger Limo Rental Atlanta, IN
 12 Person Limo Rental Atlanta, IN

Insurance Coverage

This might sound like a no-brainer, but any limo service company worth your money should have the appropriate car insurance and licensing. Don't ever book a party bus or a trip to the airport with a company that doesn't have the right insurance. Personal auto policies Personal auto policies won't cut it - you don't want to be held responsible if there's any sort of mishap on the road. At LSG International, all of our drivers are licensed, and our company maintains the proper car insurance to cover every vehicle in our fleet.

Latest News in Atlanta, IN

10 Atlanta Restaurants to Get Excited About Opening in 2024

Happy New Year, Atlanta! And, with the dawn of a new year, we’ve already hit the ground running and are tracking the progress of nine hotly anticipated bars and restaurants opening in and around Atlanta in 2024. This includes the openings of an Afro-Caribbean restaurant in downtown Atlanta, a sprawling eco-friendly dining and drinking district in Chamblee, an East Lake restaurant and bar serving Viet-Cajun-style barbecue and frozen drinks, and the debuts of two wine bars on the Southside Beltline trail and in Decatur...

Happy New Year, Atlanta! And, with the dawn of a new year, we’ve already hit the ground running and are tracking the progress of nine hotly anticipated bars and restaurants opening in and around Atlanta in 2024. This includes the openings of an Afro-Caribbean restaurant in downtown Atlanta, a sprawling eco-friendly dining and drinking district in Chamblee, an East Lake restaurant and bar serving Viet-Cajun-style barbecue and frozen drinks, and the debuts of two wine bars on the Southside Beltline trail and in Decatur

Put the following nine restaurants and bars opening around Atlanta this year on your radar.

Location: 110 Mitchell Street, Downtown AtlantaWho: Chef Malik Rhasaan and Detric Fox-QuinlanProjected opening: Winter 2024

The opening of the next Afro-Caribbean restaurant from Che Butter Jonez owners chef Malik Rhasaan and Detric Fox-Quinlan takes place this winter at the new Origin hotel. Located on Mitchell Street in downtown Atlanta, look for an all-day menu to include breakfast and some of the Southwest Atlanta restaurant’s most popular dishes, like the That Sh!t Slambing lamb burger.

Location: 240 North Highland Avenue, Inman ParkWho: Justin Amick and William StallworthProjected opening: Winter 2024

Justin Amick and William Stallworth, the duo behind the Painted Pin, the Painted Duck, and forthcoming pickleball venue Painted Pickle, open their next gaming restaurant venture together in Inman Park this winter. Painted Park takes over the former Brasserie and Neighborhood Cafe at Parish space on North Highland Avenue and will serve food and drinks, feature games inside and outside, and include an expansive outdoor seating area overlooking the Eastside Beltline trail.

Location: 1050 Howell Mill Road, Star MetalsWho: Chef Jason Liang and John ChenProjected opening: Winter/Early Spring 2024

Momonoki and Brush Sushi owners chef Jason Liang and John Chen open cafe and bar Lucky Star this winter at the Star Metals complex on Howell Mill Road. Located beside sushi restaurant Hayakawa, Lucky Star is an all-day cafe and bar in front during the day, with a cocktail bar pouring drinks behind it in the evenings. Look for coffee and pastries from baker ChingYao Wang and Taiwanese fried chicken sandwiches and street snacks at the cafe throughout the day. At the cocktail bar in back, expect an intimate experience featuring drinks like the New York sour, martini, and a shiso gin and tonic, along with a nightly cocktail omakase and food pairings from Liang.

Location: 2371 Hosea L Williams Drive, East LakeWho: Chef Avery Cottrell and John Ward Projected opening: Early Spring 2024

Gene’s, a Viet-Cajun barbecue and comfort food pop-up from chef Avery Cottrell and John Ward of Victory Brands restaurant group, opens this spring in the former Salaryman space at Hosea and 2nd. Located next door to Poor Hendrix in East Lake, expect Viet-Cajun-style dishes and barbecue, boudin egg rolls, marinated crab claws, and Gulf fish dip with buttered and seasoned Saltines on the menu. Cottrell says he hopes to capture the divey beach vibes of Gulf Coast institution the Flora-Bama in East Lake. With Cottrell’s ties to Kimball House, look for a drinks menu created by Miles Macquarrie of beach dive cocktails and frozen drinks and Jell-O shots.

Location: 119 East Ponce de Leon Avenue, DecaturWho: Chef Terry KovalProjected opening: Spring 2024

James Beard award-winning chef Terry Koval (the Deer and the Dove) is opening Decatur’s first wine and amaro bar this spring. Located in the former Sweet Seed Salad space next door to Cafe Alsace, Fawn will be cozy, moody, and low lit—similar to the wine bars found all over Italy and Spain. Look for a tight menu of charcuterie and local cheeses, crudos, fresh breads and pitas, caviar, and desserts from Koval. The Deer and the Dove beverage director Matt Watkins plans to offer a variety of amaro at the bar, along with wines from volcanic regions, including by the glass and bottle selections from the Canary Islands, Crete, Campania in Italy, and Verne in France.

Location: 5105 Peachtree Boulevard, ChambleeWho: Justin StaplesProjected opening: Spring 2024

While food halls are nothing new for Atlanta, Block and Drum aims to be something different. Billed as an eco-friendly entertainment district, expect plentiful outdoor seating, green spaces with an outdoor stage, container restaurants, a micro-distillery and tasting room, listening bar, cafe, and hydroponic farm. Located along the Rail Trail at the corner of Clairmont Road and Peachtree Boulevard, the cafe at Block and Drum opens this winter serving coffee and a limited breakfast and brunch menu, with the entire complex and its restaurants and bars fully operational by May.

Location: 1123 Zonolite Road, Woodland HillsWho: Chef Kevin GillespieProjected opening: Spring/Summer 2024

Nàdair (nuh-DARE from the Scots Gaelic phrase “dòigh nàdair” or “the way of nature”), from chef Kevin Gillespie, opens in the former Floataway Cafe space later this year. It’s a restaurant the Top Chef alum considers “the next chapter” of Woodfire Grill and its cooking. Gillespie is keeping details on Nàdair close to the vest right now, but plans to share more on the restaurant, including the design, opening date, and menu, in the coming weeks.

Location: 113 Church Street, MariettaWho: Chef Brian So and Daniel CrawfordProjected opening: Summer 2024

Spring chef Brian So hinted at opening another restaurant in Marietta with longtime business partner Daniel Crawford back in 2022, and has made good on that promise, announcing the opening of Korean restaurant Bōm this summer. Part of the redevelopment plans for a retail strip along Church Street in downtown Marietta, Bōm (“spring” or “springtime” in Korean) taps into So’s Korean roots, serving Korean hot pots and soups and other comforting Korean dishes, along with Korean beers and soju and soju cocktails delivered on rolling carts in the dining room.

Location: 680 Hamilton Avenue, Boulevard HeightsWho: Kayla BellmanProjected opening: Summer 2024

Kayla Bellman, the owner of Finca to Filter in West End and Old Fourth Ward, brings the Southside Beltline trail an all-day coffee shop serving frozen desserts and a natural wine bar right next door. Located in two repurposed buildings part of the Penman complex on Hamilton Avenue, expect Finca to Filter to feature its coffee and signature coffee concoctions, along with breakfast burritos, egg dishes, and toasts in the morning, followed by frozen desserts like frozen bananas, chocolate bars made from fair trade chocolate and cacao, and ice cream and champagne in the afternoons. At Side Saddle Wine Saloon, the 20-seat wine bar will feature natural and low-intervention wines by the glass and bottle, many from women- and femme-owned wine producers. The latter ties in with the philosophy behind the Finca to Filter brand, which works to highlight LGBTQ+, women, and BIPOC purveyors and community members.

Location: 1020 Spring Street, MidtownWho: Steve PalmerProjected opening: Fall 2024

Taking over the historic H.M. Patterson Home and Garden building on Spring Street, a yet-named restaurant and bar from Indigo Road restaurant group founder Steve Palmer is opening at Spring Quarter in 2024. It will encompass all 24,000-square-feet of the nearly century-old mortuary building. Offering morning-to-night dining and drinking options throughout the day, Palmer and Spring Quarter developer Portman Holdings plan to release more information on the restaurant later this winter.

Poll: What are Atlanta's chances of landing Sundance Film Festival?

Atlanta as host city of the largest independent film festival in the United States? Could that idea be transformed from make-believe to reality? Top-ranking city officials seem to think so.The City of Atlanta has officially submitted its bid, or a Request for Proposal, to the Sundance Institute in hopes of becoming the new home of the annual, storied Sundance Film Festival, beginning in 2027.With its Park City contract expiring in 2026, the iconic institute founded by Robert Redford announced in April it could be pulling up sta...

Atlanta as host city of the largest independent film festival in the United States? Could that idea be transformed from make-believe to reality? Top-ranking city officials seem to think so.

The City of Atlanta has officially submitted its bid, or a Request for Proposal, to the Sundance Institute in hopes of becoming the new home of the annual, storied Sundance Film Festival, beginning in 2027.

With its Park City contract expiring in 2026, the iconic institute founded by Robert Redford announced in April it could be pulling up stakes from the Utah mountain town, opening a bidding process for a potential move to a new U.S. city. Deadline reports the State of Utah plans to bid hard to keep the festival either in Park City or Salt Lake City, but a potential move has been brewing for months, as festival organizers view the expiring contract as a means to remake the Sundance experience in the digital age.

Enter: Y’allywood?

According to a City of Atlanta announcement, ATL’s Sundance pitch is “robust” and illustrates how the festival could plant roots here and grow up alongside the city, the beating heart of what's now the sixth largest metro in the country. Atlanta joined an unspecified number of cities that were invited by Sundance to submit an RFP, following another phase that closed May 1.

The city has also prepared a slick presentation that emphasizes Atlanta’s TV/film track record, transportation infrastructure, food scene, diversity, thousands of hotel rooms, current film festivals, and 11 small-scale venues for screening flicks along one 2.5-mile route alone, stretching from Plaza Theatre and Variety Playhouse around to King Center in Sweet Auburn.

“Atlanta is where the worlds of film, entertainment, economic development, diversity, and inclusion meet and grow cohesively, together,” Mayor Andre Dickens said in a prepared statement. “We’re ready to show the Sundance Institute that Atlanta is the place where opportunities are endless, and Sundance can continue to shine.”

Sundance Institute reported the festival, typically held over 11 days, drew about 117,000 people in 2020, before events were interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic and virtual viewership boosted reported attendance numbers in more recent years. (By comparison, an estimated 150,000 out-of-town visitors came to Atlanta for the city's most recent Super Bowl in 2019.)

To sweeten the pot, the City of Atlanta and its partners, including the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau, have pledged $2 million to support their cause, in addition to “a robust array of concessions and in-kind support to the festival,” per the city announcement.

According to the Salt Lake City Tribune, another contender, Boulder, Colo., has offered a $1.5 million incentive if Sundance would cross borders to its neighboring state. Other cities—including Traverse City, Mich., and San Francisco—have recently dropped out of the Sundance running.

Sundance officials have said they’re aiming to announce their decision near the end of 2024, or early next year, once all bidding cities have been vetted. Which means it’s time, dear people of ATL, for this important question:

Choices

Yes. We've got the world-class infrastructure to do this right.

Possibly. But competition will be fierce.

I'd say 50/50.

Nope. It won't happen here.

Who cares? Too much else to address first.

...

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Metro Atlanta adopts official new slogan. What say you, ATL? (Urbanize Atlanta)

Why Is South America’s Leading Soccer Tournament Being Played in the United States?

On Thursday, at 8 P.M. Eastern Time, Lionel Messi’s Argentina will defend its title as the South American champion in the opening game of the Copa América, the longest-running international soccer tournament in the world. It won’t take place, however, in any country south of the Darién jungle but in the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, in Atlanta, and Argentina’s first opponent will be Canada. The United States, Mexico, Jamaica, Panama, and Costa Rica will also participate in this South American tournament, whi...

On Thursday, at 8 P.M. Eastern Time, Lionel Messi’s Argentina will defend its title as the South American champion in the opening game of the Copa América, the longest-running international soccer tournament in the world. It won’t take place, however, in any country south of the Darién jungle but in the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, in Atlanta, and Argentina’s first opponent will be Canada. The United States, Mexico, Jamaica, Panama, and Costa Rica will also participate in this South American tournament, which will be held in Atlanta, East Rutherford, Orlando, Charlotte, Kansas City, Arlington, Houston, Austin, Glendale, Las Vegas, Inglewood, and Santa Clara. The final, on Sunday, July 14th, will be played in Miami Gardens.

How has it come to this? The first and most simple answer is that South America is in such a mess that it can no longer take care of its most precious tournament. It’s not like the Copa has had a smooth history. Conceived as part of the centennial celebrations of Argentina’s independence from Spain, in 1816, its first edition took place in Buenos Aires during two weeks in July of 1916, among only four teams—Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Chile. Six more national teams were added in the following decades: Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela, covering almost all the continent. (Guyana and Suriname, the remaining South American nations, became and still are part of CONCACAF, the association that governs North American, Central American, and Caribbean teams, including the U.S. national team. All other South American teams belong to CONMEBOL.)

Different crises have interrupted the Copa over the years. It was played annually until 1929, apart from 1918, owing to the flu pandemic, and 1928, when Argentina and Uruguay participated in the Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, instead. In 1930, Uruguay hosted the first-ever World Cup, defeating Argentina in the final; the subsequent beef between the two countries—and the two leading teams—prevented the Copa from being played for most of the following decade. Various reasons contributed to only six Copa Américas being held in the nineteen-forties, six in the fifties, and just two in the sixties, among them a waning interest in some countries before broadcasting rights made the sport hugely profitable.

In the nineteen-eighties, it was decided that host countries would be appointed in alphabetical order. Argentina and Colombia were scheduled to co-host the Copa in 2020, but it was delayed owing to the COVID pandemic. The following year, the games in Colombia were suspended in the midst of widespread anti-government protests, and in Argentina, owing to health concerns. And then Brazil, which had hosted it in 2019, took over again. The final, won 1–0 by Messi’s Argentina over his friend Neymar’s Brazil, was played in an almost empty Maracanã Stadium, in Rio de Janeiro.

This year, it was Ecuador’s turn to host. But, in November, 2022, the president of the Ecuadorian Football Federation, Francisco Egas, warned in a radio interview that “we don’t have the capacity to organize the Copa América.” In fact, the nation was in an unprecedented crisis, the result of an especially devastating bout of the pandemic that led to the collapse of public services and brutal gang violence, which, at the beginning of this year, resulted in a declaration of national emergency. When Ecuador decided to pass, CONMEBOL and CONCACAF saw an opportunity to offer an expanded Copa América in the U.S. in anticipation of the 2026 World Cup, when the U.S. will be one of the host countries. They not only embraced the U.S. as the host of the Copa but changed the structure of the tournament to include six CONCACAF members.

“Why is Copa América played in the United States this year? Simple answer: money,” Pablo Alabarces, a sociologist and the author of several books on soccer, including “A Minimal History of Football in Latin America,” told me. Oscar Barnade, the vice-president of the Argentinean Center for Research on the History of Football, concurred, saying that CONMEBOL’s management has “surrendered to the economic power of the U.S. and the M.L.S. (Major League Soccer).”

The Copa had been hosted in the U.S. once before, in 2016, for a special celebration of its centennial. It took place a year into the FIFA corruption case, an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice which found that federation executives, including a number from CONMEBOL and CONCACAF, had received more than two hundred million dollars in bribes on marketing and broadcast deals. Despite that scandal, the Cup broke records of attendance with nearly 1.5 million spectators, giving a serious boost to the effort, several decades old, to make soccer a popular sport in the United States. More than a hundred million people watched the matches on Univision and Fox. (Broadcasting rights are core to the soccer business: they generated forty-five per cent of FIFA’s revenue between 2019 and 2022, which totalled nearly $7.6 billion.)

Last year, Messi, who had led Argentina to victory in both the 2021 Copa América and the 2022 World Cup, joined Inter Miami, an M.L.S. team. Apple TV+ had recently signed a $2.5-billion, ten-year deal to stream the league’s games. The operation has been quite successful. After Messi joined Inter Miami, the club’s value increased from six hundred million dollars to more than a billion. On the day he made his début, Apple TV+ saw a 1,690-per-cent increase in subscriptions to its M.L.S. Season Pass. Ticket prices for his first Inter Miami games increased by more than a thousand per cent in the secondary market. The club’s Instagram account jumped from 1.1 million to 6.9 million followers immediately after Messi announced his decision; Messi now has more than five hundred million followers of his own. Celebrities have been flocking to see him play, including LeBron James, Serena Williams, Prince Harry, Kim Kardashian, Leonardo DiCaprio, Will Ferrell, and Selena Gomez. Earlier this year, Messi was named America’s favorite professional athlete in a national poll conducted by Social Science Research Solutions; it was the first time a soccer player topped the list.

Recent surveys by Gallup and Pew Research show that soccer, the most popular sport in the world, is now the fourth most popular in the U.S., behind football, baseball, and basketball. Additionally, it has a more diverse and younger fan base than other major sports. It is the favorite sport among Latinos, a population of more than sixty-three million people and growing; if U.S Latinos were a country, it would be the third-largest in Latin America, after Brazil and Mexico. Not surprisingly, most of the Copa América matches will be played in cities with significant Latino populations.

Beyond the conquest of this tantalizing American market, the transformation of the Copa América from a purely South American tournament into a transcontinental one fits perfectly with a global, twenty-first-century trend: the transnationalization of the sport that Americans know as soccer and the rest of the world knows as football. These days, major European teams routinely tour the U.S., Asia, and Australia in the pre-season; players from the Global South are sold as soon as they are turned out by local academies to European clubs owned not only by millionaires from around the world but even by state proxies, as in the case of Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. You can even follow the adventures of two Hollywood actors buying an old and failing club in a small town in Wales and turning it into a global sensation.

Tournaments, no matter how traditional, have to adapt to the new reality. Two years from now, the World Cup will be played, for the first time, in three countries—Canada, the U.S., and Mexico—and the number of participants has been boosted from thirty-two nations to a record forty-eight. On the bright side, one could argue that the sport is now reaching fans in stadiums in countries where the top international players never competed before. On the other hand, the price of admission to the matches is becoming increasingly prohibitive. Standard tickets for Copa América games average two hundred and eighty dollars and have surpassed eight thousand on resale.

In this new world, consumers replace fans, and star-struck audiences crowd out the old sport lovers. In February, almost forty thousand people attended an Inter Miami match in Hong Kong, paying at least eight hundred and eighty Hong Kong dollars (about a hundred and twelve U.S. dollars) per ticket to watch the best player in the world. But Messi, who was injured, remained on the bench the entire game. “We want Messi,” the fans chanted, and then demanded a refund. A diplomatic crisis followed, with various government and sports authorities in Hong Kong and Beijing responding angrily, and the state press alleging “political motives.” Messi was forced to clarify that, truly, he had nothing against China. ♦

New building made from Georgia-grown timber opens in Old Fourth Ward

Wrapped in gray paneling with ample windows, the exterior of the new four-story building at the corner of Ponce de Leon Avenue and Glen Iris Drive looks decidedly more modern than its hulking, brick neighbor, Ponce City Market.But inside, the rich wood floors and timber beams overhead reveal that this mixed-use property is like few others in metro Atlanta or the country.The building, known as 619 Ponce, was constructed entirely from timber grown in Georgia and manufactured by regional suppliers, using centuries-old techniques t...

Wrapped in gray paneling with ample windows, the exterior of the new four-story building at the corner of Ponce de Leon Avenue and Glen Iris Drive looks decidedly more modern than its hulking, brick neighbor, Ponce City Market.

But inside, the rich wood floors and timber beams overhead reveal that this mixed-use property is like few others in metro Atlanta or the country.

The building, known as 619 Ponce, was constructed entirely from timber grown in Georgia and manufactured by regional suppliers, using centuries-old techniques that are experiencing a revival as developers seek to reduce their environmental footprint. On Thursday, 619 Ponce officially opened its doors to the public in Atlanta’s bustling Old Fourth Ward neighborhood, just steps away from the Beltline.

Credit: Jason Getz / Jason.Getz@ajc.com

The 115,000-square foot building was spearheaded by Jamestown, the company behind Ponce City Market and several other properties in the area. Those include the recently completed Signal House, a residential development that towers over the Eastside Beltline, and Scout Living, a still-under-construction hospitality concept next door to 619 Ponce, which will offer flexible lengths of stay when it opens later this year.

The 619 Ponce building is made of mass timber, a catch-all term for a range of engineered wood materials with the strength to serve as a structure’s load-bearing bones, in place of the steel and concrete that are typically used in commercial buildings today.

Heavy timber construction has been used for centuries in churches, schools and more. And while modern mass timber buildings are more common in Europe, the technique is catching on in Atlanta and around the U.S.

In Atlanta, the T3 building in Atlantic Station was built using similar timber techniques. The structures also meet fire safety codes.

Producing steel and concrete requires lots of energy and in turn, results in emissions of huge amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are heating up the planet. The wood in mass timber, on the other hand, stores carbon that would otherwise be in the air contributing to global warming.

Credit: Jason Getz / Jason.Getz@ajc.com

Most mass timber used in the U.S. is imported from Europe or Canada. For 619 Ponce, Jamestown used a regional supply chain, a first for a mass timber building in Georgia, the company says. Doing so was challenging, but the environmental benefits were worth it, said Matt Bronfman, the CEO of Jamestown.

“You’re sort of undercutting your sustainability story if you’re bringing your timber in on a slow boat from somewhere else in the world,” said Matt Bronfman, the CEO of Jamestown.

The wood itself is southern yellow pine harvested from Georgia forests, including from timberland Jamestown owns and manages near Columbus. The wood was converted into lumber at a Georgia-Pacific sawmill in Albany, and then laminated into panels and beams at a plant in Dothan, Alabama, run by SmartLam. The onsite construction — akin to assembling a large LEGO set, Jamestown executives said — was completed by the engineering firm StructureCraft and the construction company JE Dunn.

Utilizing mass timber and manufacturing it all locally resulted in emissions reductions of 75% compared to a typical concrete building, Jamestown says.

Andres Villegas, president & CEO of the Georgia Forestry Foundation, called 619 Ponce a blueprint for how “a local forestry supply chain can unlock meaningful reductions in carbon emissions in the built environment while supporting Georgia’s greatest natural asset — its working forests.”

Beyond the environmental upside, Bronfman said there are other perks to using mass timber.

“Let’s be honest, it’s prettier,” he said, standing in one of the building’s airy open floors beneath golden wood beams. “Being in a building like this is simply a better experience in a lot of ways.”

Credit: Jason Getz / Jason.Getz@ajc.com

The home furnishing retailer Pottery Barn has already opened an 18,000 square foot outpost on the ground floor, and the accounting and HR firm Sage has leased 57,000 square feet on the top two floors. Overall, the building is about 67% leased.

The modular assembly mass timber allows reduced construction overall construction time, Jamestown said.

There are a few drawbacks, primarily the cost. Alexandra Kirk, a vice president of development and construction at Jamestown, said the building’s total price tag was still being finalized, but estimated the premium the company paid for mass timber versus concrete and steel was less than 15%.

Jamestown’s hope is that completing this building and establishing a supply chain will make future mass timber projects cheaper. The company said it doesn’t yet have firm plans to start another mass timber construction yet, but it is considering it for other properties it owns in Metro Atlanta and other cities.

-Staff reporter Zachary Hansen contributed to this report.

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Genius: MLK/X showrunners on behind-the-scenes motivations and how filming in Atlanta helped the show

The filmed-in-Georgia series is streaming on Hulu and Disney+March 8, 2024National Geographic’s award-winning anthology series Genius, which chronicles some of the most innovative and impactful figures in our collective history, took a bold swing in its fourth season. While previous seasons told the story of just one person—Albert Einstein, Pablo Picasso, and Aretha Franklin respectively—the most recent season, ...

The filmed-in-Georgia series is streaming on Hulu and Disney+

March 8, 2024

National Geographic’s award-winning anthology series Genius, which chronicles some of the most innovative and impactful figures in our collective history, took a bold swing in its fourth season. While previous seasons told the story of just one person—Albert Einstein, Pablo Picasso, and Aretha Franklin respectively—the most recent season, Genius: MLK/X, parallels and contrasts the life journeys of two iconic Black leaders. Underground Railroad standout Aaron Pierre portrays Malcolm X, while the ever-impressive Kelvin Harrison, Jr., a New Orleans native who most recently starred in Chevalier and Cyrano, plays Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

When Woman King and Love & Basketball director Gina Prince-Bythewood and her equally multihyphenate husband Reggie Bythewood, creator/showrunner of Apple TV+ teen basketball series Swagger, were approached about featuring Dr. King for Genius, they suggested the series tackle them both figures. This was inspired by Dr. King and Malcolm X’s only documented meeting on March 26, 1964 at the U.S. Capitol as the Senate debated the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Two works based on this moment helped fuel the series: Jeff Stetson’s play The Meeting and historian Peniel E. Joseph’s in-depth 2020 book The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. Stetson was an executive producer on MLK/X, while Joseph was part of the series’s academic “think tank” and even helped pen a couple of the eight episodes.

Steering the ship fell into the hands of showrunners Raphael Jackson Jr. and Damione Macedon, whose previous producing credits include the Starz series Power. Atlanta magazine caught up with the duo to discuss all-things MLK/X, now available to binge in its entirety on both Hulu and Disney+. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

What were your goals or game plan going into MLK/X?

Damione Macedon: What’s interesting is we had a whole plan going into it based on our knowledge at the time of Martin and Malcolm and Betty [Shabazz] and Coretta [Scott King]. I have a degree in history, and I was quite confident that I knew enough at the time to guide us through the story. Very, very quickly as we started doing our research, we put together a think tank with Reggie and Gina Bythewood. We got together a group of academic scholars who had written about Martin and Malcolm and Betty and Coretta for years, and, in some cases, knew them personally. Five minutes into our meeting with them, all of us realized we didn’t know nearly as much [as we thought]. It was a really cool, humbling moment, and we wanted the audience to have that kind of reaction when they watched the series. Every single hour, they can learn something new about who these people were, as human beings, not just the millions and millions of iconic things that they did, and people they touched. We were fascinated by what kind of people they were, what made them laugh, the relationships they had with each other, how they handled the birth of their children, how they handled the ups and downs of public life.

One of the more illuminating aspects of the series is the spotlight placed on the impact of not just their fathers, but their mothers and wives as well.

Raphael Jackson Jr.: It’s impossible for the two of them not to have found strong women as they grew older because of the landmark laid down by their parents and their mothers. It was the easiest thing to see once you lay down the story of why they were chosen by Coretta and Betty, because they sought out strong female representation in their lives that only made them better for what they did and what they were trying to do. So, when you lay that up against the women that helped raise them, it makes sense. We can see why Betty wanted to be with Malcolm and vice versa, and why Coretta wanted to be with Martin and vice versa.

How did Kelvin Harrison, Jr. (Martin Luther King Jr.), Aaron Pierre (Malcolm X), Weruche Opia (Coretta Scott King), and Jayme Lawson (Betty Shabazz) become these historical figures?

Jackson Jr.: One of the first things that that you see when you sit down with them is how committed they were to the roles and the enormity of taking on this task. And as creators and showrunners, all you can ever hope for or pray for is that you have talent that takes it seriously. Literally, within one second, that was asked and answered. So, for us, it was seeing the passion they had; they were ferocious with reading as much about Martin, Malcolm, Betty, and Coretta as they could. They came to the table with ideas and with conversations, that only enhanced stories that we were trying to get into the writers’ room.

With filming in Georgia, in Atlanta and Macon, how did you keep the story from leaning closer to Dr. King?

Macedon: We never did this specifically where this character gets this amount of page time. We tried to keep that as organic as possible. But what Atlanta brought for us, it cannot be understated on how it helped create this show for us. Filming in Atlanta, we, on one side, had extras. They were our arsenal and some of them had a direct connection to the Civil Rights Movement. We would have extras on our set at times, older extras, that remember marching with Dr. King, being in a barbershop with Dr. King, going to Ebenezer Church. And so that connection was palpable when we were filming. On the flip side of that, which was really illuminating for us, is we filmed Atlanta for everything. So, our New York is in Atlanta, our DC is in Atlanta. [Our Selma, Alabama, we filmed in Macon.] And what we found was, not only was Atlanta overly knowledgeable about the Civil Rights Movement as it related to Martin, they were equally as knowledgeable about Malcolm. We found the community in Atlanta and in the places that we filmed to be so engaged on both sides that it never felt one-sided to us while filming it there. And that’s a true testament to the people of Atlanta, to the community that they built to bring the TV and film industry there. It was great to work with everybody.

All eight episodes of Genius: MLK/X are streaming on Hulu and Disney+.

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